I will miss those little houses; Nuuk, Greenland

(Source: xxiaochenn, via velveteenrabbit)

David Lynch does the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge with iced coffee [x]

(Source: andreii-tarkovsky)

transpondster:


The Simpsons and My So-Called Life seemingly overlap very little on any sort of television Venn diagram. And yet, watching both this weekend, it was clear that they share some central spirit. Of course, both shows are about family, the reliable chaos of closely tethered people rattling around under one roof. Both series, in their own particular ways, are keen to the forever shifting resentments, allegiances, and power dynamics of familial life. And when confronting the outside world, the series are admirably, stunningly even, attentive to detail and texture, that certain essential spark of life. The Simpsons, in its heyday, was a cartoon populated by very few cartoons, while MSCL was the rare show about teenagers to not pit kids against a monolithic idea of adults, or vice versa. (Compare Patty’s interactions with Rayanne’s mom, Amber, played by the wonderful Patti D’Arbanville, to those with her best friend, Mary Kay Place’s Camille—the adults have real, varied relationships, too!) Smart and empathic and clever in an age when a lot of television wasn’t, these two shows were both, in their wildly different styles, beautiful and thorough depictions of American life.

(via
The Simpsons and My So-Called Life are the Right Kind of 90s Nostalgia | Vanity Fair)

transpondster:

The Simpsons and My So-Called Life seemingly overlap very little on any sort of television Venn diagram. And yet, watching both this weekend, it was clear that they share some central spirit. Of course, both shows are about family, the reliable chaos of closely tethered people rattling around under one roof. Both series, in their own particular ways, are keen to the forever shifting resentments, allegiances, and power dynamics of familial life. And when confronting the outside world, the series are admirably, stunningly even, attentive to detail and texture, that certain essential spark of life. The Simpsons, in its heyday, was a cartoon populated by very few cartoons, while MSCL was the rare show about teenagers to not pit kids against a monolithic idea of adults, or vice versa. (Compare Patty’s interactions with Rayanne’s mom, Amber, played by the wonderful Patti D’Arbanville, to those with her best friend, Mary Kay Place’s Camille—the adults have real, varied relationships, too!) Smart and empathic and clever in an age when a lot of television wasn’t, these two shows were both, in their wildly different styles, beautiful and thorough depictions of American life.
(via
thechapterfourblog:

Holy shit.
If that doesn’t put the finest point on it you’ve ever seen/heard, I don’t know what does.

thechapterfourblog:

Holy shit.

If that doesn’t put the finest point on it you’ve ever seen/heard, I don’t know what does.

(Source: thedragoninmygarage, via wilwheaton)

"Now I have only one thing left to do: nothing. I don’t want any belongings, any memories. No friends, no love. Those are all traps."

Trois couleurs: Bleu (dir. by Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1993)

(Source: theroning, via andreii-tarkovsky)