artemisdreaming:

Border

Shigeru Yoshida


Photographs and text by Shigeru Yoshida (via: lensculture)

"Praying gives us calm and peace in our hearts. It also brings us hope. We know this in our hearts. 

In March 2011, Japan had a big disaster, the Great East Japan Earthquake. Right after the major earthquake, the traffic network got blocked. People who suffered from the disaster helped each other.

I heard that many foreign people were surprised to know that the store owners in stricken areas opened their stores and provided food for free to victims who were waiting in line quietly to get the relief supplies. But this didn’t surprise me and other Japanese people at all. I think that this is exactly how Japanese people are.

When I visited the stricken areas affected by the earthquake and tsunami, I saw a lot of people putting their hands together and praying. It seemed everybody, even those who were not victims, was doing so, and very naturally. It’s been more than a year now but they still keep praying. 

As for us Japanese, we pray not only to God but also to Nature, such as the sun, seas, trees and rocks. We have also given prayers for our ancestors and people who passed away. We do this naturally, and have been doing this since we were born. Praying is such a thing for Japanese people. We show respect and gratitude for everything in prayer.

As is being proven in the medical world, praying might have a special power. It is said that praying makes plants grow up fast, or works within the human genome with healing power. It is not easy to reveal why praying is so effective, but I am trying to express the hidden energy of prayer in my photographs.” (lensculture.com)


Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward in publicity photos for From the Terrace, 1960.

(Source: thelittlefreakazoidthatcould)

60y:

Gottfried Helnwein working at the studio.Los Angeles, 2014

60y:

Gottfried Helnwein working at the studio.
Los Angeles, 2014

(via mamua)

The female doesn’t want a rich man or a handsome man or even a poet, she wants a man who understands her eyes if she gets sad, and points to his chest and say : “Here is your home country.”
— Nizar Qabbani (via wordsthat-speak)

(via batifoler)

littlemicrobiologyblog:
mrcaptaincook:
kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell
Kinesins are my favourite proteins! Walk it out kinesin! 

littlemicrobiologyblog:

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

Kinesins are my favourite proteins! Walk it out kinesin! 

(via joetheblogger)

scottlava:

“They’re all mistakes, children! Filthy, nasty things. Glad I never was one.”

scottlava:

They’re all mistakes, children! Filthy, nasty things. Glad I never was one.”

Nobody likes you anymore. You’re tarnished! FILTHY!

Perfect Blue (1997) dir. Satoshi Kon

(Source: gyllenhaals, via andreii-tarkovsky)

In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.
— ― Lundy Bancroft


(Source: womensliberationfront, via beemill)

mingsonjia:

 伍启中 水墨山水人物

Shuimo Painting by Wu qizhong

(via thegiftsoflife)

engineeringhistory:

Evelyn Boyd Granville, mathematician and computer programmer at IBM. In 1949 she became one of the first African American women to receive a Ph.D. in mathematics from Yale University.

engineeringhistory:

Evelyn Boyd Granville, mathematician and computer programmer at IBM. In 1949 she became one of the first African American women to receive a Ph.D. in mathematics from Yale University.

explore-blog:

Fox’s Garden – a tender wordless story about the gift of grace and the power of kindness to those kicked off, illustrated by French artist Princesse Camcam in lyrical cut-paper dioramas. 

explore-blog:

Fox’s Gardena tender wordless story about the gift of grace and the power of kindness to those kicked off, illustrated by French artist Princesse Camcam in lyrical cut-paper dioramas. 

Just look at life with more playful eyes. Don’t be serious. Seriousness becomes like a blindness. Don’t pretend to be a thinker, a philosopher. Just simply be a human being. The whole world is showering its joy on you in so many ways, but if you are too serious, you cannot open your heart.
— Osho  (via leviathanrose)

(Source: emotional-algebra, via thesensualstarfish)

greeneyes55:

Mexico 
Photo: Bernard Plossu

greeneyes55:

Mexico

Photo: Bernard Plossu

20thcenturypix:

don56:

Louise Brooks in a publicity still for “The Canary Murder Case” (1929)

1929

20thcenturypix:

don56:

Louise Brooks in a publicity still for “The Canary Murder Case” (1929)

1929