fuckyeahbeautifulblackwomen:

Eartha Kitt photographed at the pool by Isaac Sutton, c. 1959

There’s something about Eartha Kitt…

(Source: satindolls, via vintagevandalizm)

real-hiphophead:

Muhammad Ali Tribute

The Greatest

(via vintagevandalizm)

cinemagorgeous:

Before They Pass Away. Photographer Jimmy Nelson traveled around the earth to try and document the world’s most secluded tribes. 

(via talltells)

whataboutbobbed:

holidaymakers enjoying a cup of tea in the sun lounge at Blackpool Tower, April 11, 1936

whataboutbobbed:

holidaymakers enjoying a cup of tea in the sun lounge at Blackpool Tower, April 11, 1936

whataboutbobbed:

feeling crabby, April 11, 1936

whataboutbobbed:

feeling crabby, April 11, 1936

beemill:

A Compost Experiment

UW Farmers, keep making your compost. The compost crew just tested our product, so we can show you that it works.

When I sent an email to the UW Farm list­serv to enlist help for start­ing toma­toes in Octo­ber 2013, I received a cou­ple of puz­zled responses from our con­cerned vet­eran farmers:

Kay, ya know it’s win­ter right?”

Why are you start­ing toma­toes at this time of the year? Just curious.”

It was not because we were crav­ing greenhouse-grown toma­toes, nor was it because we were in denial of winter’s arrival. It was because we were using tomato plants as our exper­i­men­tal “subjects”.

This exper­i­ment was dove­tail­ing of my research ques­tion and inter­ests with those of our farm man­ager Sarah Geurkink. I was inter­ested in find­ing out whether the com­post that farm­ers have always been mak­ing in our Back Forty actu­ally helps improve soil fer­til­ity. At the same time, Sarah was con­cerned about the impov­er­ished state of the soil at the UW Farm’s new Mer­cer site. Unlike the rich, dark and sweet-smelling soil we have at the Botany Green­house site, where com­post has been added for years, the soil at Mer­cer looked mostly like a mix­ture of dry, grey sand and silt inter­spersed with jaggy lit­tle rocks.

Is it just the look of the soil that dif­fers? Or is it func­tion­ally dif­fer­ent for plant growth as well? The pic­tures here are worth a thou­sand words (although the thou­sand words fol­low for those of you inter­ested in nitty-gritty eco­log­i­cal meth­ods). Mer­cer soil made stunted tomato plants, but even 25% of that soil replaced with UW-grown com­post helped them thrive!

read more: http://blogs.uw.edu/uwfarms/2014/02/03/a-compost-experiment/

drakontomalloi:

William Morris Hunt - The Snow Storm. 1859

drakontomalloi:

William Morris Hunt - The Snow Storm. 1859

(via drtuesdaygjohnson)

0wenhart:

Between 1941 and 1953, Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre featured in five films together. On-screen, the dynamic pair presented a wild contrast of character and displayed incomparable rapport — off-screen there was much of the same; they were great friends, drinking buddies, and practical jokers on the set. 

During Bogart’s tumultuous third marriage to actress Mayo Methot - a long time sufferer of alcholism and paranoia - Lorre’s home was his refuge when he could no longer stand to be under the same roof as his confrontational wife. Later in the same decade, when Bogart met his fourth and final wife, Lauren Bacall, the two would escape the press at Lorre’s ranch while their relationship, in it’s early stage, was still under wraps.

The two remained close friends until Bogart’s death in 1957. Lorre passed away in seven years later in 1964.

(via the-dark-city)